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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/11055/1017
Title: A prospective six-month audit of airway incidents during anaesthesia in twelve tertiary level hospitals across Australia and New Zealand
Authors: Endlich, Y
Beckmann, LA
Siu-Wai, C
Culwick, MD
ANZCA/FPM Author: Beckmann, LA
Culwick, MD
Endlich, Y
Keywords: Airway management
Incident reporting
Abstract: This audit of airway incidents was conducted over six months in 12 tertiary level hospitals across Australia and New Zealand. During that time, 131,233 patients had airway management and 111 reports were submitted (incidence 0.08%). The airway incidents included a combination of difficult airway management (83), oxygen desaturation (58), aspiration (19), regurgitation (14), laryngospasm (16), airway bleeding (10), bronchospasm (5) and dental injury (4), which gave a total of 209 events in 111 reports. Most incidents occurred during general anaesthesia (GA; 83.8%) and normal working hours (81.1%). Forty-three percent were associated with head and neck surgery and 12.6% with upper abdominal procedures. Of these patients, 52% required further medical treatment or additional procedures and 16.2% required unplanned admission to an intensive care unit or a high dependency unit. A total of 31.5% of patients suffered from temporary harm and 1.8% from permanent harm. There was one death. The factors associated with a high relative risk (RR) of an airway incident included American Society of Anesthesiologists Physical Status (ASA PS) (ASA PS 2 versus 1, RR 1.75; ASA PS 3 versus 1, RR 3.56; ASA PS 4 versus 1, RR 6.1), and emergency surgery (RR 2.16 compared with elective). Sedation and monitored anaesthesia care were associated with lower RRs (RR 0.49 and RR 0.73 versus GA, respectively). Inadequate airway assessment, poor judgement and poor planning appeared to be contributors to these events. Future teaching and research should focus on these areas to further improve airway management and patient safety.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/11055/1017
DOI: 10.1177/0310057X20945325
ISSN: 0310-057X
Journal Title: Anaesthesia and Intensive Care
Type: Journal Article
Affiliates: University of Adelaide
University of Queensland
University of Hong Kong
Royal Brisbane and Women’s Hospital
The Australian and New Zealand Tripartite Anaesthetic Data Committee
Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists
Study/Trial: Reviews/Systematic Reviews
Appears in Collections:Scholarly and Clinical

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